Science KS3

 INTRODUCTION

Everyone must follow a National Curriculum Science course. Students will study a number of Biology, Chemistry and Physics Modules meeting the AQA Specification from years 7-11. Bespoke modules of work are created to meet the needs of the students.

WHAT TOPICS WILL I STUDY DURING THE COURSE?

KS3

  

Biology

Chemistry

Physics

Cells

Movement

Breathing

Particle model

Elements

Contact forces

Gravity

Universe

Variation

Human reproduction

Plant Reproduction

Periodic table

Metals and non-metals

Separating mixtures

Energy transfer,

Heating and cooling

Current, Voltage and resistance

Energy costs, Work

Digestion

Respiration

Photosynthesis

Acids and alkalis

Chemical energy

Types of Reaction

Pressure

Speed

Magnetism

Electromagnets

Interdependence

Inheritance

Evolution

Earth structure

Earth resources

Climate

Sound

Light

Wave effect

Wave properties

WHAT SKILLS WILL I USE AND DEVELOP?

You will have the opportunity to study key concepts that you will come across in everyday life and link them to scientific ideas and their implications for society. This will be done in a creative way allowing you to complete practical activities within a laboratory setting.

You will learn to develop a critical approach to questioning the world around you;

You will learn how to collect and process scientific evidence and develop your understanding of how science works.

WHAT EXAMINATIONS WILL I TAKE?

End of unit tests.

HOW WILL MY WORK BE ASSESSED?

During KS3, each module will run for approximately 6 weeks. During that time there will be a range of assessment opportunities: a check-point activity half way, assessed homework, classwork and an assessment with a focus on literacy. At the end of each module pupils will complete a test.

HOW WILL THE COURSE HELP ME WITH MY FUTURE CAREER?

Jobs in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) field have slowly been on the increase. In the UK, the percentage of STEM jobs has increased by 1.5% since 2008. This means that interest in working in these industries is on the rise and has its benefits. After all, in the US, STEM jobs are typically considered to be one of the highest paying industries.

Taken from: https://jobs.telegraph.co.uk/article/connecting-to-stem/

Please see this article for more information about careers in STEM

WHO SHOULD I CONTACT FOR MORE INFORMATION?

Rachel Byron (Head of Science)